China’s Communists praise economy, people are protesting

Although the world political and business elite have been consistent in imposing their faith in the alleged growth and strength of Chinese economy on West, sometimes facts are breaking through this censorship barrier. This is exactly what happened on Tuesday.

When  thirty thousand veterans from People’s Liberation Army surrounded the Ministry of Defense and other regime’s buildings in Beijing protesting at authorities, on the other side of the country Premier Li Keqiang praised China’s economy “that has fared better than expected so far this year”.

“On the whole, the economy this year, especially in the third quarter, is better than expected”, Keqiang said.

It is far from clear whether the Chinese economy really performed, since all of the business data is being controlled by the Communist Party of China.  Party feeds the Western financial institutions with them whenever it wants.

At least one major group of Chinese people, veterans, did not agree with the Premier and protested at authorities’ failure to deliver promised pension medical and social security benefits.

A protesting group included lower-ranking officers, non-commissioned officers, and regular soldiers as well as soldiers who participated in nuclear tests, and the Vietnam War.

During the protest veterans complained for unjust government directive that divides city dwellers from those living in rural areas. The city-dwellers receive no social subsistence payout, they complained.

“I signed up to the army in 1976 in Beijing, and was demobilized in 1988,” a protester who only introduced himself as Gao said in interview with Radio Free Asia. “It wasn’t too bad to start with, but then they started laying people off in the factories, and we were just given 400 yuan and told to leave.”

“That was never going to be enough. We have been unfairly treated. I gave my best years to the army, and I have nothing to show for it”, Gao added.

“”It’s pretty unfair right now, for all of us who took part in that campaign,” other protester surnamed Wang said. “They issued a directive in 2007 drawing a distinction between those of us who live in towns and those of us in rural areas.”

“They pretty much dropped us city-dwellers; we get nothing, and we have to try to get by on social subsistence payouts,” he said. “You have to claim social subsistence before you become eligible for any care by the state at all.”

“We are very upset about this,” Wang said.

Perth Herald Tribune has learned that the Chinese police stopped many veterans from entering Beijing.

In September 2015, Beijing police detained more than 1,000 veterans who gathered outside government buildings in protest over similar issues.

If organised and mobilised, the PLA veterans are one of the strongest social groups in China that can break a backbone of the Communist regime.

(RFA, pht)