Atheism Puts Asleep, Faith Awakens

(Fa Barboza)




Believers reported less peaceful sleep while atheists stated they slept well, the authors of the study found.



A false sense of peace is not a blessing but a threat that several authors of the Bible had warned over the centuries. Prophet Ezekiel warned its audience against the appearance of peace on many occasions. They have led My people astray, saying, "Peace," when there is no peace, once he stated. Prophet Isaiah described rebellious people who expect to be told pleasant words to have peace of mind. In more contemporary times of our era, Apostle Paul informed that in the final days, while people will be saying, "Peace and security," destruction will come upon them suddenly.

A personal peace in itself, or more precisely a feeling of no concern,
is not what a believer should desire.

Therefore a personal peace in itself, or more precisely a feeling of no concern, is not what a believer should desire. A diligent student of the Bible who has an understanding of the urgency of application of the principles of love of God and neighbor knows that the injustice is not a rare occurrence but rather a typical feature of the political, economic, and social order. With such awareness, the believer will have trouble sleeping quietly, unlike the atheists whose conscience is sleeping.

According to this way of thinking, the results of a recent study on the quality of sleep conducted by Baylor University Religion Survey seem to be logical.
It included more than 1,500 participants who were asked about their religious affiliation, behaviors, and beliefs, as well as their average nightly sleep time and difficulty getting to sleep.

With an awareness of widespread injustice and lack of love,
the believer called to imitate loving God and realising of his or her own failures
will have trouble sleeping quietly,
unlike the atheists whose conscience is sleeping.


While 73 per cent of atheists and agnostics said they got seven or more hours of nightly sleep, only 63 per cent of Catholics and only 55 per cent of Baptists said they got at least seven hours of sleep a night, preliminary data show.

Catholics and Baptists were also more likely to report having difficulty falling asleep than atheists and agnostics.


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