Beijing Launches Military Drill on South China Sea. Again.

The Communist China Navy held its largest ever drill in the South China Sea in 2018. (AFP)

 

Xi Jiping's regime lauched on Tuesday a massive military maritime drill in the region vital for international trade.


Communist China’s Maritime Safety Administration announced that an area of roughly 80 square kilometers in Chinese waters to the west of Guangzhou’s Leizhou Peninsula and north of Hainan Island would be closed for military exercises between March 1 and March 31.

Beijing's regime withdrew any information about the character of the exercises but it only said it would occur within a 5-kilometer radius of a point off the coast of Guangdong in the Gulf of Tonkin.

The month of exercises launched on Monday is just the latest set of Communist China's military activities in the South China Sea, where China, Vietnam, the Philippines, Taiwan, Malaysia, and Brunei are locked in a series of overlapping maritime and territorial disputes.

In February, a fleet of Beijing regime's Navy participated in what was called a multilateral joint naval exercise at the invitation of the Pakistani navy, Communist China's Ministry of National Defense informed.

In the middle of the month, Chinese bombers arried out maritime assault and maritime strike exercises in the South China Sea region, and People’s Liberation Army aircraft have repeatedly entered Taiwan’s air defense identification zone between the Pratas Islands and the Taiwanese mainland. States require aircraft to follow certain identification procedures when entering their declared air defense identification zones.


Beijing arrogance is a consequence of the erroneous Western policies towards
the Communist state that included open trade and closed eyes to its hostile intentions

 

The Communist China's PLA Navy also conducted a joint exercise with Singapore’s navy last week. According to a report published by the U.S. Naval War College China Maritime Studies Institute in September 2020, the PLA Navy regularly engages in this kind of naval diplomacy in support of various political and strategic objectives.

Ms. Oriana Skylar Mastro, an expert at Stanford’s Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies, stated that “Chinese military activities are becoming more and more frequent in the South China Sea.”

Part of this is a consequence that the Chinese military became more powerful. And it now tries to test and hone its capabilities, Ms. Mastro said.

But these activities are also aimed at communicating Beijing’s resolve and deterring foreign powers, Ms Mastro concluded.

The US and Western allies have been trying to maintain control of South China deeply worried about the prospect of Beijing's invading Taiwan.
Over the past two months, the U.S. Navy has repeatedly carried out “freedom of navigation operations” and other such activities in the South China Sea, and French forces have transited the area as well. And other countries, such as the United Kingdom and Germany stated it would send naval assets to the region too.

 

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