The July 11 Anti-Communist Uprising Renewed Faith In Peaceful Change in Cuba

Many Cubans are perceiving the July 11 and 12 mass protests against the Havana regime as the beginning of the end of the dictatorship on the island, have concluded the analysts from the Cuban Center for Human Rights.

Although many expected that the Cubans would take to the streets, this explosion was almost unimaginable. Although the social and economic situations appeared to be the logical reason for the social explosion, the loudest protest shouts had political character: Freedom! and Down with the dictatorship! ”, highlighted the opposition leader Ms. Martha Beatriz Roque Cabello, coordinator of the Cuba-based organisation, in the report published on Monday.

The national anti-Communist uprising has broadened the margin of Cubans, who believe in the peaceful change of the political system, the authors of the report observed. The report stated the young generation had strengthened its resolve that the transformation can occur in this decade.

According to Ms. Roque Cabello, the events during the anti-Communist uprising on July 11 and subsequent days have left clear evidence of human rights violations on the island and how the government of Havana violates its laws.

The report points out that information collected in different parts of the country reveals that countless people have been beaten and tortured, forcefully subjected to the contagion of the Wuhan virus, amid official denials.


The feeling of defenselessness vis a vis regime shared by the whole society

The regime officials deny the atrocities and want to prove that all the arrests honored the due process guarantees. However, the many videos, photos, and testimonies uploaded to the networks tend to agree with the protesters, stated Mr. Roque Cabello.

The activist affirms the general population shares that the feeling of defenselessness experienced until recently only by the political opposition. Many families found themselves not being able to do anything, deprived of information where the regime detained their loved ones even if they were ill or disabled, she explained.

The Cuban Center for Human Rights divided the July report into two parts: one includes describes the detentions that are not linked to the events of July 11, and another includes information on detainees on this date and later period.

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