US To Limit Power Of Social Media Platforms




US Administration is trying to make the social media firms accountable for its censorship as well as a tolerance of criminal activity.


The Department of Justice on Wednesday sent draft legislation to Congress that would weaken parts of Section 230 of the 1996 Communications Decency Act, the landmark law that has underpinned the growth of the modern internet.

Though the legislation is unlikely to be taken up by a divided Congress just weeks before the presidential election in November, the legislative package reflects how companies like Facebook and Google face bipartisan suspicion of their power and influence.

“For too long Section 230 has provided a shield for online platforms to operate with impunity,” said William Barr, the US attorney-general. He urged Congress to reform the law to “hold online platforms accountable both when they unlawfully censor speech and when they knowingly facilitate criminal activity online”.

The proposed legislation targets Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, and Instagram stripping immunity for "truly bad actors". It also takes aim at websites that censor legal but offensive content, excluding companies if they did not act in "good faith".

The new law would limit the range of the filter for the content eliminating political and cultural including racial ideologies.

The U.S. Justice Department is also preparing anti-trust lawsuit against Google monopoly on search engines in Internet.


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